Physical antipyresis in critically ill adults

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July 8, 2019
physical antipyresis in critically ill adults

Kiekkas bp(1), brokalaki h, theodorakopoulou g, baltopoulos gi. Author information (1)university hospital of patras in patras, greece. Gr nurses use a variety of methods to cool critically ill patients, even though there are no guidelines for the treatment of temperature elevation.

In order to determine whether physical methods of antipyresis, such as the application of cooling blankets, are appropriate for use in the icu.

Overviewnurses use a variety of methods to cool critically ill patients, even though there are no guidelines for the treatment of temperature elevation in this population.

Nurses use a variety of methods to cool critically ill patients, even though there are no guidelines for the treatment of temperature elevation in this population. In order to determine whether physical methods of antipyresis, such as the application of cooling blankets, are appropriate for use in the icu, and if so which methods are best, the authors conducted a literature review.

Nurses use a variety of methods to cool critically ill patients, even though there are no guidelines for the treatment of temperature elevation in this population. In order to determine whether physical methods of antipyresis, such as the application of cooling blankets, are appropriate for use in the icu, and if so which methods are best, the.

Fever effects and treatment in critical care literature review. Considering that the incidence of fever may reach up to 75 among critically ill adults, healthcare professionals employed in the intensive care unit (icu) are called to evaluate and manage patient temperature elevation on a daily basis.

Physical antipyresis in critically 111 adults a literature review exomines external cooling methods for use in the icu.

Review of controlled trials relevant to physical antipyresis methods applied to critically ill patients. Online-only content for physical antipyresis in critically ill adults by kiekkas and colleagues in the american journal of nursing, july 2008.

В  in fact, some studies have suggested that antipyresis in critically ill septic patients may be harmful (1517). The majority of prior meta-analyses of the effect of antipyretic therapy in the critically ill have not focused on septic patients (1820).